#EDU19 Where Good Ideas Come From – Keynote

Welcome to EDUCAUSE 2019!

  • Welcome to EDUCAUSE 2019! 8,398 attendees, 41 countries – making this one fo the largest conferences in history.
  • Imagine and explore transformational opportunities in highered
  • DX – Digital transformation is a focus on how to create and generate change.

Digital transformation (Dx) describes a cultural, workforce, and technological shift, enabled by advances in technology that include analytics, artificial intelligence, cloud, mobile, social networks, storage capabilities, and more. Combined with external drivers such as increased expectations from students for a seamless experience, decreased funding for higher ed, and a growing need to advocate for its benefits, these forces make it possible to think differently about higher education, with the potential for new business models, better student outcomes, and different, more innovative, approaches for teaching learning, and research.

  • “The power of technology to connect us as human beings – support teaching, learning is a focus.” – Linda John, Associate Vice Provost of Learning Technologies, UW (EDUCAUSE Leadership Award).
  • Melissa Wood, Senior VP of IT at Stony Brook University (EDUCAUSE DEI Leadership Award) – “Lead from where you are.” Lead by listening.

Where Good Ideas Come From

Building on his best-selling work and book on the history of innovation, author and PBS host Steven Johnson will share his insights on the environments, practices, and platforms that best support new ideas and creativity, and provide a glimpse of the coming tech revolutions that will transform tomorrow’s educational landscape.

Presenter

  • Steven Johnson
  • Notes

    • We are too grounded in the “eureka” movement. “The apple falls from the tree…” Truly transformative ideas come out of a slower evolutionary process – a slow hunch. An inkling of possibility and exploration.
    • Highered is a wonderful place to incubate ideas.
    • People and teams that keep the hunches alive that can evolve over time and that are applicable to the world are innovative.
    • This sticker was on the original cern server where the entire web was powering the internet:

    • CERN and Tim Berger’s-Lee is a good example of the “slow hunch”. Came out of a hobby, keeping track of people in the office when he met someone new – created a hyperlink between the staff and the projects happening. “Inquire within upon everything” was used internally. Initially WWW was named “tangle”. After 5 years of this side project, perhaps this is something bigger. “I believe I have created a new global communication medium as a side job…”
    • Emerging concept of identity…
    • We need to keep side projects and hunches alive.
  • “Liquid Networks” – The enlightenment used to happen in the 18th century coffee house. Semi-public spaces. Flow of ideas happen around coffee! šŸ™‚ We need more of these spaces to nurture ideas and help them emerge!

    • How do we handle or blind spots? Well… we can’t work alone. The importance of diversity. Diverse groups are collectively more smart, more creative, and have better decision making.
    • Innovative groups have large and engaged friend networks. We need to maintain our cross-pollination vs specialization.
    • Ada Lovelace is a fascinating figure and is widely considered to be the worlds first software programmer in 1830. Math prodigy. Charles Babbage created the first “programmable computer”.
    • Someday these machines can be used for more than numbers and calculations, but for creativity and even composing music. – Ada Lovelace
    • Let’s look at who is using technology and are having the most fun. These are areas that have influence. Just for the fun of it – trigger advanced in tech, culture, politics, etc
    • MIT and the PDP-1… the first monitor where you can push around pixels. They created a space theme game called space war (like “asteroids”). This created innovation around joysticks, input devices, mouse, visuals… and fun. A shift to computers and more creative and playful. “The personal computer” phrase was coined and lead to Atari and a company started by Steve Jobs.
    • What is happening now, that looks like play, that contains the seeds for predicting what comes next.
    • Play leading to transformative ideas… AI, deep learning, machine learning – today the major milestones have interestingly come from games.
    • December 2017 – Googles AI division deep mind, was the beginning of something with “Alpha Zero” game play algorithm and drew from extensively with chess play. Built-in and the computer used it to predict game play. After the end of 9 hours, the 2 AIs played 400 millions games. The game they were playing at the end was aggressive and better than what humans were capable.
    • There are a whole range of cause, effect, subtle language, and yet have super human skills. This is another place where the importance of diversity is crucial. Some kinds of problems are better solved by AI, but other problems will be required of humans. Key is which tool when, and the ability to collaborate.
  • To survive we need to work with AI, with a diverse group of people, those are going to be the liquid networks of the future – all connected through collaboration. – Steven Johnson

  • One thought on “#EDU19 Where Good Ideas Come From – Keynote

    1. Pingback: eLearning Team attends EDUCAUSE Annual Conference | eLearning and Emerging Technologies @GVSU

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