#BbWorld18 – DEVCON18 Opening Keynote

Blackbord’s Chief Product Officer Tim Tomlinson kicks off DevCon 2018 with a look at the past year and highlights to look forward to in the coming year. This is a must-see for all attendees!

  • 380 attendees, 250 institutions, 24 countries at the BbWorld Developers Conference
  • Amazon AWS Sponsor
  • DevCon Kickoff and Product Update
  • @timtomlinson
  • An uptick this year in first time attendees, welcome!
  • #IAmBlackboard – Last year 20th anniversary of the founding of Blackboard. We celebrate and thank you from the Blackboard team. Bb is an #edtech company, and there is a personal connection to mission to helping institutions drive success through access to education. The story about Blackboard is about the educational opportunities provided through education.
  • Blackboard has provided a diversity and inclusion scholarship for 2 attendees this year.

  • One of the benefits of partnering with Bb is this team of smart, engaged, dedicated people on mission to support education.
  • Blackboard Product Development Pillars

  • Crocodoc to Box migration didn’t go as well as planned and Bb is committed to direct enhancements in the Box platform such as working now to include the ability to download submissions/feedback.
  • Saas Deployment – Now live with 6 areas across the globe. SaaS momentum is strong.

  • 20% of client base on Saas.
  • Blackboard is providing more services also on Saas. SafeAssign is a recent addition to Saas.

  • New Learn Ultra feature highlights… continuing to make Ultra feature complete. If you have not looked at Ultra recently (within 3 months) it’s time to look again. It is a much more fully feature product that it once was, pace has really ramped up.
  • 61 clients on Ultra in production, 34 in pilots, and over 300 clients going through cohort sessions toward adoption.
  • Educator Preview is now CourseSites and access to experiment and play.

  • Great positive feedback on Learn Ultra.
  • 1 Learn, 2 Experiences (original, ultra), 3 Deployments (self-hosted, managed hosted, SaaS)
  • Be looking at SaaS and Learn Ultra as an end date. We want to walk with you through the journey at your pace.
  • Blackboard Ally is very exciting and adoption has been strong.

  • Ally improves accessibility as well as coach faculty along the way with an institutional dashboard for tracking and monitoring.
  • 187 million documents scanned with 1.9 million student impact.
  • Ally is available on Bb Learn, Moodleroooms, Moodle, Canvas
  • Blackboard Instructor App now includes grading! Enables instructors to manage your courses, send announcements, and connect with students. Time was taken to make sure use cases and workflows for grading where in line with needs.

  • REST API progress is expanding and maturing greatly.

  • IMS Standards Support is key for Blackboard and an initiative that provides engagement in the standards community.
  • Blackboard has been recognized as an award winner in many areas, including CODiE and the Blackboard student mobile app with a 4.5 star rating.

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#ETOM18 – Highlights from the Educational Technology Organization of Michigan Spring Retreat

ETOM 2018 Spring Retreat
June 11-12, 2018 at the Kettunen Center – Tustin, MI

The Spring Retreat is a yearly ETOM event with an administrative focus on distance education and educational technology.  Gathering together to compare notes, share best practices, and discuss current issues and trends in online and hybrid teaching and learning provides great value for directors of online programs, instructional designers/technologists, and faculty.

 

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Distance Education the HLC Perspective

Presenter: Dr. Tom Bordenkircher

Session Description: Distance Education the HLC Perspective – Tom Bordenkircher, Ph.D., Higher Learning Commission

Dr. Bordenkircher will provide a general overview of regional accreditation and the expectations of institutions accredited through the Higher Learning Commission. There will be particular focus on federal and commission rules for distance education courses and programs. He will then discuss best practices as when offering programs at distance. Common pitfalls and red flags will be reviewed through provided case studies. This will also be an opportunity to provide feedback to the HLC on the criteria and accreditation process. This session will end with a look forward to the future of accreditation and proposed changes on the horizon.

Notes:

  • Keys for assurance documentation is all about “evidence”.
  • 75% or more offered by distance methods are Distance Courses.
  • 50% or more of courses in a program are Distance Programs.
  • HLC approves capacity to offer distance and/or correspondence education.
  • Program has an entrance and an exit and you get a credential.
  • Peer reviewer – examine blended or hybrid courses to see if they conform to the Distance definition.
  • Investigate if it’s possible to “cobble” together a Distance degree with existing distance courses.
  • The level of faculty interaction is a distinct difference between distance education and correspondence courses.
  • Distance education: Education that uses one or more of the following technologies to deliver instruction to students who are separated from the instructor and to support regular and substantive interaction between the students and the instructor, synchronously or asynchronously. Technology may include: internet, 1 and 2 way transmissions through broadcast.
  • Higher ed has only 60% of market with 40% being for profit. And this is still changing.
  • HLC does not review student identity verification protocols. This is a responsibility of the federal government. The student who registers is the same student that participates and completes. Institutions should have systems to monitor repetition of IP and email addresses.
  • If a fee is required for student identity such as a proctored exam, the institution must disclose the cost at the time of registration.
  • HLC guidelines align with C-RAC. All require evidence around what activities support.
  • Clearly demonstrate institutional capacity, planning, quality, support, and evaluation relative to distance education.
  • Ensure distance education is integrated into assurance argument.

Be sure to focus on the CRAC Guidelines as these are criteria used by HLC for distance education.

Presentation Files:


Educational Technology Organization of Michigan (ETOM) and Michigan Colleges Online (MCO) Updates

Ronda Edwards (MCO Executive Director), Carl Weckerle (ETOM President), Stacy Whiddon (President-Elect). Ronda will provide an update on MCO initiatives and issues around online learning – including, SARA, accessibility, group technology purchases, MCO OER repository, MCO professional development series for 2018-2019. Carl and Stacy will provide an update on recent ETOM initiatives and lead a discussion on future ETOM member benefits.

ETOM vision and mission statements have been revised.

  • ETOM Vision StatementETOM is the premier instructional technology-focused post-secondary entity in the state of Michigan. We provide access to high quality, low cost professional development activities and certification focused on educational technology and distance learning.  ETOM provides a network for sharing and collaboration among faculty and staff.  By maintaining a strong relationship with the Michigan Colleges Online (MCO), ETOM is recognized as the primary source for professional development relating to successful post-secondary student learning through technology in the State of Michigan.
  • ETOM Mission StatementThe Educational Technology Organization of Michigan is a non-profit organization dedicated to the use of instructional technologies in higher education with an emphasis on distance learning. Established in December of 1980, ETOM has, and continues to be, a valuable resource for Michigan community colleges, universities, related businesses, other educational organizations and interested individuals.
  • 2018 Plans
    • New this year will be a year long calendar of events that include conferences as well as monthly meet ups.
    • This Fall the ETOM conference will be held on November 2 at Macomb Community College. Keynote speaker will be Michelle Pacansky-Brock who will talk on the topic of Humanizing Online Education.
    • Meet up topics to include guest speakers or experts on a variety of topics: quality, accessibility, OER, online orientations, academic integrity, HLC, QM, etc.

Michigan Colleges Online

  • OER Initiative
    • Goals: improving student success and completion, lowering costs for students, increasing inter-institutional faculty collaboration
    • Developed a MCO microsite repository on OER Commons
    • Over $4 million of savings just last year. 15 schools are involved in the OER initiative.
    • Faculty grants have been offered in OER adoption, adaption, and development categories.
    • 5 OER faculty conversations have occurred through online webinars.
    • Michigan OER Summit will be held on September 21, 2018 hosted by St. Clair County Community College, Port Huron.
  • MCO Accessibility Community of Practice
    • Share knowledge and review best practices that can assist colleges as they become compliant with federal regulations.
    • MCO shared a 9 key items that colleges should address to begin to be compliant.  Webinars have been also created for web content, procurement, etc. Agendas will be forthcoming.
  • MCO Collaborative Programs Initiative
    • Goal to build capacity in financial model for high cost low enrollment programs.
    • Additional sessions will continue for a collaborative programs: eg. MRI Associate Degree, Computed Tomography Certificate, EEG Technician Certificate with option for an Associate Degree.
  • Collaborative Purchases
    • BlackBeltHelp – US based help desk call center. Licensed reduced costs close to 45% off standard rates.
    • Fit Faculty – Qualifications management software.
  • Professional Development
    • Landscape of Web Accessibility in Higher Ed
    • FitFaculty
    • Ready Set Go – Developing a CBE Program
    • MCO/TechSmith Vendor Program
    • Creating an Accessible Syllabus
    • MCO Repository Group Training
    • MCO OER Faculty Conversations for Science, Math, Composition, History, and Psychology
    • Creating Accessible PowerPoint and PDF Files
    • Intellis Learning Demo
    • Kaltura Video Platform Demo
    • NetTutor Demonstration
  • Stats
    • Online enrollment growth is up 5%. ITC reports 8% increase from Fall 2016-17.
    • Online students – 40% male 60% female, ages 18-25 60%, and reside locally.

Accessibility in Action Across the College – Roundtable

Shaelynn Long-Kish, Mid Michigan Community College

  • Discussions on how many colleges have received OCR complaints and the process for campuses to bring new awareness for the importance of accessibility.

Save the Date for the ETOM Fall Conference!

savethedateETOMFallConference2018


About ETOM

ETOM – Educational Technology Organization of Michigan
Michigan’s Distance Learning Resource

The Educational Technology Organization of Michigan is a non-profit organization dedicated to the use of instructional telecommunications in higher education with an emphasis on distance learning. Established in December of 1980, ETOM has, and continues to be, a valuable resource for Michigan colleges and universities, related businesses, other educational organizations, and other interested individuals.

 

#MACUL18 – Changing the Narrative

Closing Keynote: Changing the Narrative Joe Sanfelippo. Superintendent, Fall Creek School District (WI)

Joe Sanfelippo is the Superintendent of the Fall Creek School District in Fall Creek, Wisconsin, home of the Crickets and an Innovative District in 2016 and 2017 by the International Center for Leadership in Education. Joe co-hosts the Hacking Leadership Podcast and co-authored The Power of Branding: Telling Your School’s Story, Principal Professional Development: Leading Learning in a Digital Age, and Hacking Leadership: 10 Ways Great Leaders Inspire Learning That Teachers, Students, and Parents Love. He was selected as a Future Ready Superintendent in 2014 and a Personalized Learning Leader by the US Department of Education in 2016. He holds a BA, two Masters of Science, and a PhD.

Notes:

  • Moment of Awe – Stop in your tracks, take it in, appreciate.
  • Today I shall behave as if this is the day I will be remembered – Dr. Seuss
  • Be. Proud. – Don’t defend the work, celebrate the work!
  • Let’s tell the story and tell the narrative.
  • “I’m just a teacher” NO “I’m a teacher”
  • In the absence of knowledge people make up their own. – Hacking Leadership
  • Culture first always, share the story. Change it in 30 seconds.
  • Every single time you connect with someone in your school community you are building or killing culture.
  • Culture / Trust – Building trust with your community.
  • Let’s stop thinking of school as something we pay for and start thinking about school as something we invest in.
  • Hacking Leadership Book
  • Build the culture, capture the stories, share share share
  • Internetlivestats.com

#MACUL18 – Putting Learning First, Technology Second

Putting Learning First, Technology Second

Liz Kolb, Clinical Associate Professor, University of MichiganGrand Gallery A (DeVos)

Notes:

  • PearDeck Slide Code: huuan
  • It all started in 1996 with… PowerPoint!
  • Technology can grab attention but does it change understanding and learning?
  • How do you know if #edtech is effective in your classroom?
  • What does engagement mean and what does it look like in your classroom?

  • How can we make learning experiences… authentic with high attention and high commitment.
  • What do we know about how students learn best? What does the research say?
  • Reflection – thinking about what they are doing/experiencing, teaching others, discovery-based, real-world application, when they are challenged and in the zone of proximal development, repetition, interactive, hands-on, inquiry-based
  • Use caution with “educational” apps as there really isn’t criteria for what makes an app educational in category. Many software companies don’t have an experienced educator on the team.
  • Learning with #edtech should be about quality not quantity.
  • One research study indicated purposeful and blended approaches seem to be better than “every day”

  • Wowzers Video
  • What distracts students from learning? What is distracting in the Wowzers video?
  • USF Video
  • What is beneficial about the USF video? Collaborative, it wasn’t about the technology but it supports the learning.
  • Learning is SOCIAL!

  • Shared experiences are important vs being together and isolated experiences.
  • Technology provides formative opportunities for feedback through data measurement.
  • Engagement is social > time on task > and focus so that tech should not distract from the process of learning.
  • Learning happens when tools illicit higher-cognitive skills.
  • Learning happens best when it’s connected to everyday life with classroom learning.
  • Key to success when integrating technology is the teacher’s use of instructional strategies and pedagogical strategies when integrating digital technologies, not the tool itself.
  • Triple E Framework

#MACUL18 – Rethinking Assessment: Digital Tools to Engage, Assess, and Differentiate

Rethinking Assessment: Digital Tools to Engage, Assess, and Differentiate

Becky Shiring, @beckyshy, Director of Professional Development and Continued Learning, Squirrels, LLCGallery Overlook E

Notes:

  • What is the PURPOSE of assessments?
  • PADLET – Introductions
  • WHY do we assess our students?
    • To measure achievement, understanding, outcomes, objectives, drive instruction are they ready to move on, to see if we taught what we intended, to see what they know before we teach. Mastery of skills, standards, evaluate progress, provides channel of feedback, motivates students.
  • What are the BENEFITS of using technology to assess?
    • Quick feedback, collaboration, captures data/evidence, track common misunderstandings, more engaging for the kids (Kahoot), quickly capture data, easily shareable, engages students, immediate feedback, permanence of learning, ownership, authentic tasks.
  • TYPES of Assessment
  • FORMATIVE
    • Check for understanding for researching opportunities before they get to the end. Are the students ready before summative. Low stakes, ongoing, feedback, assessment FOR learning
  • SUMMATIVE
    • High stakes, end of unit, evaluation, assessment OF learning.
  • “When the cook tastes the soup that’s formative, when the guests taste the soup it’s summative.”
  • Types of Adjustments
    • In the moment adjustments (Kahoots, stop light cards, exit ticket, etc.), next class, last chance (just before the “big test”), learning approach adjustments (student driven, they way they take notes, student reflections, they way the student owns their learning and the teacher guides), classroom climate adjustments (learning for all vs competitive, student ownership of data and mindset). Quick Checks for Understanding vs a long formal quiz that can’t allow quick on-the-fly teaching adjustments.
  • Corrective Instruction and the Formative Assessment Cycle (Plan > Teach > Assess > Analyze Data/Student Work > Adapt/ReAssess)
  • “Virtual Corkboards” – Supports multiple formats, mobile app, personalization, exit tickets, thinking maps, KWL, group projects, comments for peer/teacher feedback.
  • PADLET has new features for profanity filters, up and down voting, linking, custom urls, etc. Upload, links, Google images, Snap, Film, Voice, Draw, Map, PADLET link. All in the free version.

  • NoteApp and Stormboard are other options.
  • Simple Media Tools – Demonstrate understanding, apply concepts to new contexts, highly engaging, promotes new media literacy.
  • Dvolver MovieMaker allows students to develop cartoon movies for scenarios, projects, assignments, etc.
    • Dvolver, Breaking News Generator, BigHugLabs
    • ISTE Standards – Supports creators of their own content.

  • Quick Response – Easy, on the spot, quick activities
    • Write Surge (quick writing tool), SketchBook (create book for drawing, ideas into a sketch), AutoDraw (quick drawing tool for creating great looking graphics), TodaysMeet
  • Video Clippers – Pause video and ask questions, effective for flipping classrooms
    • EdPuzzle, PlayPosit, Spiral.ac

  • Student Response Systems – Game based learning, instant feedback, device agnostic, gauge student interest, exports data
  • ATLAS Protocol – Learning from Student Work

What are some other technology tools that you have used for formative assessment?

#MACUL18 – Keynote: Staying Resilient in the Rapidly Changing World of Education

Bonnie St. John, Author, Speaker, and Leadership Consultant, Out of Our Mind: Learning to Be Creative

Despite having her right leg amputated at age fve, Bonnie St. John became the frst African-American ever to win medals in Winter Olympic competition, taking home a silver and two bronze medals in downhill events at the 1984 Paralympics in Innsbruck, Austria. She is also is a best-selling author, a highly sought after keynote speaker, a televi-sion and radio personality, a business owner and a Fortune 500 leadership consultant. She graduated Magna Cum Laude from Harvard University in 1986, and won a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford Univer-sity, taking a Master of Letters degree in Economics.

Notes:

  • About Bonnie St. John – Today Show
  • “Will I live a normal life? – Normal is Overrated, Aim Higher!”
  • Quartz – Being extraordinary (not looking) lasts a lifetime. “The difference between looking extraordinary and being extraordinary
  • School choices, they all matter: private, public, home, virtual…
  • Trying new things isn’t easy… This conference is about learning, the curriculum, and how to use technology to advance education.
  • How do you convert learning into technology, and how do you blend it so that it’s about the learning and not the technology?
  • GIVE a GIFT > Look at your kids and tell them, I know you can do it! Believe in them, open a door.
  • The power of diversity and it makes us more competitive. Literally this is true…
  • It’s important to make the connections across the division and move beyond the comfort zone.
  • Maybe it doesn’t work the first time, but try something new to make a difference for 1 kid, 5 kids, 10 kids…
  • Optimize everything to be a champion.
  • Ideas give the power to imagine, dream, and create.
  • If I want to be a champion, I need to do it. Train like a champion.
  • No responsible adult made me quit, and I didn’t stop myself!
  • Get up and finish, even when you don’t feel like it! Finish the race!
  • Resilience is the skill of the future. You are preparing kids for a future that doesn’t exist yet.
  • We have to get good at falling down and getting back up!
  • The person who wins is the quickest getter upper!
  • The secret to success is… failure. Invest in a portfolio of goals and be wiling to fail.
  • We are defined not by our circumstances, but rather by the VISION we hold inside ourselves.

#ETOM17 – Fall Conference Keynote

IMG_6407

DEVELOPING SOCIAL PRESENCE IN ONLINE CLASSES

Over the past decade, the Internet has had a profound impact on higher education, enabling the phenomenal growth of online learning. The altered learning environments created by web-based courses not only eliminate barriers of time and space, providing increased access to higher education, they challenge our traditional notions of teaching and learning. A common concern among educators is that the mediated nature of online learning might prevent students from developing the sense that they are interacting with others, which social learning theories suggest supports learning. The antidote to this issue is the development of social presence in online classes. Drawing from her recent co-edited book, Social Presence in Online Learning, Dr. Karen Swan will explore the notion of social presence and its importance to the success of online classes. Attention will be paid to learning designs and teaching strategies that support the development of social presence.

51oIkLQHg9L._SX348_BO1,204,203,200_Karen Swan is the Stukel Professor of Educational Research and a Research Associate in the Center for Online Learning, Research and Service (COLRS) at the University of Illinois Springfield. For the past 20 years, she has been teaching online, researching online learning, and writing extensively about her experiences. She received the Online Learning Consortium (OLC) award for Outstanding Individual Achievement, National University Technology Network (NUTN) Distinguished Service Award, and the Burks Oakley II Distinguished Online Teaching Award for her work in this area. She is also an OLC Fellow and a member of the International Adult and Continuing Education Hall of Fame.

Notes:

  • What is social presence?
    • Social Presence: What Is It And Why Does It Matter?
    • The degree in which one is perceived as a “real person” in medicated communication.
    • Social Presence = Quality of a Medium – There is a range of media from text to video to provide an element of immediacy.
    • Social Presence Theory, Media Richness Theory, Affective Channel Capacity
    • Social Presence in e-Learning Article
    • Tips: Use names when communicating with students online. Sharing social experiences. Sharing interactions and personalities. Ability to project identities.
  • Community of Inquiry Framework – Social / Cognitive / Teaching Presence

coi.png

  • Social presence translates to actual learning, perceived learning, and higher satisfaction of students in courses.

online communication is an excellent medium for social interaction

  • Quality Matters is helpful in the “design” of the course. Whereas,  COI is social constructivist measures “during” the course.
  • Social presence is a mediating variable between teaching and cognitive presence.
  • Verbal immediacy behaviors can lesson the psychological distance in online classes.
    • Use ice breakers and initial courses activities to encourage trust
    • Model the use of verbal social presence indicators
    • Encourage students to engage and share their course experiences.
  • Student learning is related to quantity and quality of postings in online discussions.
    • Use discussions as a requirement in grading
    • Use rubrics
    • Require students to respond to other students
    • Stress unique nature of discussions in student orientations
  • Learning occurs socially within communities of practice.
  • Course design can increase social presence. You need a place for students to interact.
    • Include multiple opportunities for discussion
    • Timely feedback in assignments and tests
  • Instructors develop social presence through their interactions with students in a variety of activities.
    • Assessment feedback.
    • Audio feedback.
    • Reference student activities in feedback.
    • Journals
  • The quality and quantity of instructor interactions with students is linked to student learning.
    • Announcements
    • Clear expectations
    • Provide timely and supportive feedback
    • Establish communication expectations as far as instructor response time for email, etc.
  • Instructor social presence and social presence of peers are unique.
    • Instructor social presence related to perceived learning
    • Student social presence is related to student satisfaction
  • Social presence develops over time.
    • Model use and sustain over time throughout the course
  • Greater learning from scaffolding.
  • Vicarious interaction in online course discussion may be an important source of learning. AKA Lurkers who read and not post still learn.
  • Students will do what you expect them to do. If you treat them like prisoners they will not perform. Trust your students. Incorporate social elements in a variety of technology mediums from synchronous to asynchronous – from email to announcements to text in a variety of methods – text, audio, photo, videos.

Media alone doesn’t establish social presence, people do, yet we need to deliberately support the development of social presence by leveraging media and technologies to expand learning because we know learning is a social process.