#MACUL18 – Changing the Narrative

Closing Keynote: Changing the Narrative Joe Sanfelippo. Superintendent, Fall Creek School District (WI)

Joe Sanfelippo is the Superintendent of the Fall Creek School District in Fall Creek, Wisconsin, home of the Crickets and an Innovative District in 2016 and 2017 by the International Center for Leadership in Education. Joe co-hosts the Hacking Leadership Podcast and co-authored The Power of Branding: Telling Your School’s Story, Principal Professional Development: Leading Learning in a Digital Age, and Hacking Leadership: 10 Ways Great Leaders Inspire Learning That Teachers, Students, and Parents Love. He was selected as a Future Ready Superintendent in 2014 and a Personalized Learning Leader by the US Department of Education in 2016. He holds a BA, two Masters of Science, and a PhD.


  • Moment of Awe – Stop in your tracks, take it in, appreciate.
  • Today I shall behave as if this is the day I will be remembered – Dr. Seuss
  • Be. Proud. – Don’t defend the work, celebrate the work!
  • Let’s tell the story and tell the narrative.
  • “I’m just a teacher” NO “I’m a teacher”
  • In the absence of knowledge people make up their own. – Hacking Leadership
  • Culture first always, share the story. Change it in 30 seconds.
  • Every single time you connect with someone in your school community you are building or killing culture.
  • Culture / Trust – Building trust with your community.
  • Let’s stop thinking of school as something we pay for and start thinking about school as something we invest in.
  • Hacking Leadership Book
  • Build the culture, capture the stories, share share share
  • Internetlivestats.com


#MACUL18 – Putting Learning First, Technology Second

Putting Learning First, Technology Second

Liz Kolb, Clinical Associate Professor, University of MichiganGrand Gallery A (DeVos)


  • PearDeck Slide Code: huuan
  • It all started in 1996 with… PowerPoint!
  • Technology can grab attention but does it change understanding and learning?
  • How do you know if #edtech is effective in your classroom?
  • What does engagement mean and what does it look like in your classroom?

  • How can we make learning experiences… authentic with high attention and high commitment.
  • What do we know about how students learn best? What does the research say?
  • Reflection – thinking about what they are doing/experiencing, teaching others, discovery-based, real-world application, when they are challenged and in the zone of proximal development, repetition, interactive, hands-on, inquiry-based
  • Use caution with “educational” apps as there really isn’t criteria for what makes an app educational in category. Many software companies don’t have an experienced educator on the team.
  • Learning with #edtech should be about quality not quantity.
  • One research study indicated purposeful and blended approaches seem to be better than “every day”

  • Wowzers Video
  • What distracts students from learning? What is distracting in the Wowzers video?
  • USF Video
  • What is beneficial about the USF video? Collaborative, it wasn’t about the technology but it supports the learning.
  • Learning is SOCIAL!

  • Shared experiences are important vs being together and isolated experiences.
  • Technology provides formative opportunities for feedback through data measurement.
  • Engagement is social > time on task > and focus so that tech should not distract from the process of learning.
  • Learning happens when tools illicit higher-cognitive skills.
  • Learning happens best when it’s connected to everyday life with classroom learning.
  • Key to success when integrating technology is the teacher’s use of instructional strategies and pedagogical strategies when integrating digital technologies, not the tool itself.
  • Triple E Framework

#MACUL18 – Rethinking Assessment: Digital Tools to Engage, Assess, and Differentiate

Rethinking Assessment: Digital Tools to Engage, Assess, and Differentiate

Becky Shiring, @beckyshy, Director of Professional Development and Continued Learning, Squirrels, LLCGallery Overlook E


  • What is the PURPOSE of assessments?
  • PADLET – Introductions
  • WHY do we assess our students?
    • To measure achievement, understanding, outcomes, objectives, drive instruction are they ready to move on, to see if we taught what we intended, to see what they know before we teach. Mastery of skills, standards, evaluate progress, provides channel of feedback, motivates students.
  • What are the BENEFITS of using technology to assess?
    • Quick feedback, collaboration, captures data/evidence, track common misunderstandings, more engaging for the kids (Kahoot), quickly capture data, easily shareable, engages students, immediate feedback, permanence of learning, ownership, authentic tasks.
  • TYPES of Assessment
    • Check for understanding for researching opportunities before they get to the end. Are the students ready before summative. Low stakes, ongoing, feedback, assessment FOR learning
    • High stakes, end of unit, evaluation, assessment OF learning.
  • “When the cook tastes the soup that’s formative, when the guests taste the soup it’s summative.”
  • Types of Adjustments
    • In the moment adjustments (Kahoots, stop light cards, exit ticket, etc.), next class, last chance (just before the “big test”), learning approach adjustments (student driven, they way they take notes, student reflections, they way the student owns their learning and the teacher guides), classroom climate adjustments (learning for all vs competitive, student ownership of data and mindset). Quick Checks for Understanding vs a long formal quiz that can’t allow quick on-the-fly teaching adjustments.
  • Corrective Instruction and the Formative Assessment Cycle (Plan > Teach > Assess > Analyze Data/Student Work > Adapt/ReAssess)
  • “Virtual Corkboards” – Supports multiple formats, mobile app, personalization, exit tickets, thinking maps, KWL, group projects, comments for peer/teacher feedback.
  • PADLET has new features for profanity filters, up and down voting, linking, custom urls, etc. Upload, links, Google images, Snap, Film, Voice, Draw, Map, PADLET link. All in the free version.

  • NoteApp and Stormboard are other options.
  • Simple Media Tools – Demonstrate understanding, apply concepts to new contexts, highly engaging, promotes new media literacy.
  • Dvolver MovieMaker allows students to develop cartoon movies for scenarios, projects, assignments, etc.
    • Dvolver, Breaking News Generator, BigHugLabs
    • ISTE Standards – Supports creators of their own content.

  • Quick Response – Easy, on the spot, quick activities
    • Write Surge (quick writing tool), SketchBook (create book for drawing, ideas into a sketch), AutoDraw (quick drawing tool for creating great looking graphics), TodaysMeet
  • Video Clippers – Pause video and ask questions, effective for flipping classrooms
    • EdPuzzle, PlayPosit, Spiral.ac

  • Student Response Systems – Game based learning, instant feedback, device agnostic, gauge student interest, exports data
  • ATLAS Protocol – Learning from Student Work

What are some other technology tools that you have used for formative assessment?

#MACUL18 – Keynote: Staying Resilient in the Rapidly Changing World of Education

Bonnie St. John, Author, Speaker, and Leadership Consultant, Out of Our Mind: Learning to Be Creative

Despite having her right leg amputated at age fve, Bonnie St. John became the frst African-American ever to win medals in Winter Olympic competition, taking home a silver and two bronze medals in downhill events at the 1984 Paralympics in Innsbruck, Austria. She is also is a best-selling author, a highly sought after keynote speaker, a televi-sion and radio personality, a business owner and a Fortune 500 leadership consultant. She graduated Magna Cum Laude from Harvard University in 1986, and won a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford Univer-sity, taking a Master of Letters degree in Economics.


  • About Bonnie St. John – Today Show
  • “Will I live a normal life? – Normal is Overrated, Aim Higher!”
  • Quartz – Being extraordinary (not looking) lasts a lifetime. “The difference between looking extraordinary and being extraordinary
  • School choices, they all matter: private, public, home, virtual…
  • Trying new things isn’t easy… This conference is about learning, the curriculum, and how to use technology to advance education.
  • How do you convert learning into technology, and how do you blend it so that it’s about the learning and not the technology?
  • GIVE a GIFT > Look at your kids and tell them, I know you can do it! Believe in them, open a door.
  • The power of diversity and it makes us more competitive. Literally this is true…
  • It’s important to make the connections across the division and move beyond the comfort zone.
  • Maybe it doesn’t work the first time, but try something new to make a difference for 1 kid, 5 kids, 10 kids…
  • Optimize everything to be a champion.
  • Ideas give the power to imagine, dream, and create.
  • If I want to be a champion, I need to do it. Train like a champion.
  • No responsible adult made me quit, and I didn’t stop myself!
  • Get up and finish, even when you don’t feel like it! Finish the race!
  • Resilience is the skill of the future. You are preparing kids for a future that doesn’t exist yet.
  • We have to get good at falling down and getting back up!
  • The person who wins is the quickest getter upper!
  • The secret to success is… failure. Invest in a portfolio of goals and be wiling to fail.
  • We are defined not by our circumstances, but rather by the VISION we hold inside ourselves.

#ETOM17 – Fall Conference Keynote



Over the past decade, the Internet has had a profound impact on higher education, enabling the phenomenal growth of online learning. The altered learning environments created by web-based courses not only eliminate barriers of time and space, providing increased access to higher education, they challenge our traditional notions of teaching and learning. A common concern among educators is that the mediated nature of online learning might prevent students from developing the sense that they are interacting with others, which social learning theories suggest supports learning. The antidote to this issue is the development of social presence in online classes. Drawing from her recent co-edited book, Social Presence in Online Learning, Dr. Karen Swan will explore the notion of social presence and its importance to the success of online classes. Attention will be paid to learning designs and teaching strategies that support the development of social presence.

51oIkLQHg9L._SX348_BO1,204,203,200_Karen Swan is the Stukel Professor of Educational Research and a Research Associate in the Center for Online Learning, Research and Service (COLRS) at the University of Illinois Springfield. For the past 20 years, she has been teaching online, researching online learning, and writing extensively about her experiences. She received the Online Learning Consortium (OLC) award for Outstanding Individual Achievement, National University Technology Network (NUTN) Distinguished Service Award, and the Burks Oakley II Distinguished Online Teaching Award for her work in this area. She is also an OLC Fellow and a member of the International Adult and Continuing Education Hall of Fame.


  • What is social presence?
    • Social Presence: What Is It And Why Does It Matter?
    • The degree in which one is perceived as a “real person” in medicated communication.
    • Social Presence = Quality of a Medium – There is a range of media from text to video to provide an element of immediacy.
    • Social Presence Theory, Media Richness Theory, Affective Channel Capacity
    • Social Presence in e-Learning Article
    • Tips: Use names when communicating with students online. Sharing social experiences. Sharing interactions and personalities. Ability to project identities.
  • Community of Inquiry Framework – Social / Cognitive / Teaching Presence


  • Social presence translates to actual learning, perceived learning, and higher satisfaction of students in courses.

online communication is an excellent medium for social interaction

  • Quality Matters is helpful in the “design” of the course. Whereas,  COI is social constructivist measures “during” the course.
  • Social presence is a mediating variable between teaching and cognitive presence.
  • Verbal immediacy behaviors can lesson the psychological distance in online classes.
    • Use ice breakers and initial courses activities to encourage trust
    • Model the use of verbal social presence indicators
    • Encourage students to engage and share their course experiences.
  • Student learning is related to quantity and quality of postings in online discussions.
    • Use discussions as a requirement in grading
    • Use rubrics
    • Require students to respond to other students
    • Stress unique nature of discussions in student orientations
  • Learning occurs socially within communities of practice.
  • Course design can increase social presence. You need a place for students to interact.
    • Include multiple opportunities for discussion
    • Timely feedback in assignments and tests
  • Instructors develop social presence through their interactions with students in a variety of activities.
    • Assessment feedback.
    • Audio feedback.
    • Reference student activities in feedback.
    • Journals
  • The quality and quantity of instructor interactions with students is linked to student learning.
    • Announcements
    • Clear expectations
    • Provide timely and supportive feedback
    • Establish communication expectations as far as instructor response time for email, etc.
  • Instructor social presence and social presence of peers are unique.
    • Instructor social presence related to perceived learning
    • Student social presence is related to student satisfaction
  • Social presence develops over time.
    • Model use and sustain over time throughout the course
  • Greater learning from scaffolding.
  • Vicarious interaction in online course discussion may be an important source of learning. AKA Lurkers who read and not post still learn.
  • Students will do what you expect them to do. If you treat them like prisoners they will not perform. Trust your students. Incorporate social elements in a variety of technology mediums from synchronous to asynchronous – from email to announcements to text in a variety of methods – text, audio, photo, videos.

Media alone doesn’t establish social presence, people do, yet we need to deliberately support the development of social presence by leveraging media and technologies to expand learning because we know learning is a social process.


MI #OER Summit 2017

0fac595ce47642b791bdb3ba22b2561fMichigan Colleges Online is pleased to announce the 2017 MI OER Summit – a gathering of OPEN enthusiasts and those who are interested and eager to learn, network and advocate.  This year’s event is hosted by Kellogg Community College (Battle Creek, MI) at the Binda Performing Arts Center on September 22, 2017.

speaker The keynote for the Summit is provided by Dr. Robin DeRosa – professor and chair of Interdisciplinary Studies at Plymouth State University, New Hampshire.

“Harnessing the Power of OPEN: How Open Education Can Transform Our Assignments, Courses, and Colleges”

In this presentation, Robin will focus on how we can come together as a community of learners to transform courses, assignments, and ultimately, our public colleges and universities. With a special focus on Open Educational Resources and Open Pedagogy, Robin will offer both ideas to re-inspire a sense of mission in public college instructors and examples of non-disposable assignments that will get students actively contributing to the knowledge commons. The presentation will introduce participants to the idea of connected learning, and offer new ways of conceiving of course architecture to better link students with their scholarly and professional communities of practice. Those who are fluent with using new technologies and/or OERs in their courses and those who are just beginning to explore and learn are equally encouraged to attend.



  • Book Chapter: “From OER to Open Pedagogy: Harnessing the Power of OPEN” [PDF]
  • Why are we charging students to access books in literature that are in the public domain?
  • Robin funded a collaborative project that was built with alums, incoming students, and professors. Students were paid to help out of her own pocket. Created a OER Early American Lit Research Assistants project. So with day 1 in the Fall semester, the project was done.
  • Project continues with students and teachers adding, improving, and sharing with multimedia contributions.
  • Hypothes.is was used for collaborative annotations.
  • An open text can be: interactive, collaborative, dialogic, dynamic, empowering, contributory, current, accessible, multimedia, public, and free.
  • A social justice movement is what OER is all about. – Robin DeRosa


  • 56% of students pay more than $300 per semester and 20% of students pay more than $500 per semester on textbooks.


  • Students worry more about paying for books than worry about paying for college.


  • The REAL Cost of College = tuition, course materials, transportation, child care costs, food, etc.
  • In which domains does your teaching engage? Survive > Know > Understand > Thrive > Contribute > Transform
  • Open pedagogy is the piece that happens when students are producers of knowledge not just consumers.
  • “I don’t want to join a movement focused on replacing crappy expensive textbooks with crappy free textbooks.”
  • OPEN is about access to knowledge and access to knowledge creation. – Robin DeRosa
  • Resource: “Opensem: A Student-Generated Handbook for the First Year of College
  • Resource: “Interdisciplinary Studies: A Connected Learning Approach
  • Open Pedagogy Resource: “Project Management for Instructional Designers
  • WikiEDU can provide assistance to help students create open content and “non-disposable assignments”.
  • Writing Op-Ed is another example of a “non-disposable assignment”.
  • Areas of Caution: Digital redlining and the digital divide are real and insidious. Open is not the opposite of private. EdTech is selling something. Open is a process not a panacea.


OPEN is about access to knowledge and access to knowledge creation. – Robin DeRosa

Open Education: Putting the PUBLIC back in public Higher Ed.




#ETOM17 – Summer Retreat

centerlake.jpgSummer Retreat for the Educational Technology Organization begins at the Kettunen Center with just over 30 attendees from community colleges and universities across the state.

Tackling Wicked Problems Using Design Thinking
Dr. Leigh Graves Wolf, Michigan State University

The goals of the workshop are two-fold. First, participants will engage in an embodied experience using design thinking. This will give participants first-hand and participatory knowledge of design thinking techniques and processes. Second, participants will be using these design thinking methods to address a “wicked problem” identified by ETOM, which will produce solutions (and questions) for the ETOM retreat.

Our presenter is Dr. Leigh Graves Wolf. Leigh Graves Wolf is a teacher-scholar and her work centers around online education, emerging technologies and relationships mediated by and with technology. She has worked across the educational spectrum from K12 to Higher to further and lifelong. She has been a disc jockey, network administrator, teacher, instructional technologist and now professor. She believes passionately in collaboration and community and is currently the Assistant Director of the MSU Hub for Innovation in Learning & Technology, and academic specialist in the Dean’s office in the MSU College of Education, and a fixed-term Associate professor of Educational Technology at Michigan State University.


  • Session Materials
  • How can we use Design Thinking to tackle this wicked problem: “Adequate Assessment of Online Classes”

Design Thinking is a mindset. Design Thinking is about having an intentional process in order to get new, relevant solutions that create positive impact. It’s human-centered. It’s collaborative. It’s optimistic. It’s experimental. – Eleanor Horowitz

Stanford dSchool


British Design Council Double Diamond

The IBM Loop

Design Thinking for Libraries

Rules of Design Thinking

  1. The human rule – all design activity is ultimately social in nature
  2. The ambiguity rule – design thinkers must preserve ambiguity
  3. The re-design rule – all design is re-design
  4. The tangibility rule – making ideas tangible always facilitates communication


  • Diversity, Empathy, Ambiguity —> Possibilities then open up…

Wicked Problems

A wicked problem is a social or cultural problem that is difficult or impossible to solve for as many as four reasons: incomplete or contradictory knowledge, the number of people and opinions involved, the large economic burden, and the interconnected nature of these problems with other problems. (Kolko, 2012)

Group Work

  • Attendees split up to work in teams to attempt to address: “Adequate Assessment of Online Classes”

Michigan Colleges Online Update

  • Save the Date for the Fall Conference, October 27, located at Mid Michigan Community College.
  • Online Enrollments – CHLOE report, is Online Growth Rate Slowing Down? ITC enrollment report indicated a 1% increase from Fall 2015-16. Age of online students 53% are 18-25, 44% are 26+. MCO reports up 1-2% with a total of 66,115 enrollments.
  • What is the cause of flat enrollment growth rates? What are some strategies to move the needle with online enrollment?
  • SARA – 47 states CA, FL, and MA are not currently members. SARA members need to be posting a SARA Student Complaint Process.
  • MCO OER Repository Initiative
    • Goals: Improve student success and completion, lower costs for students, increasing inter-institutional faculty collaboration
    • Steering Committee: Faculty, IDs, DE Admins, Librarians
    • oercommons.org/hubs/mco (402 assets shared in last year, with 30 uniquely authored)
    • Faculty grants for adoption (4), adaption projects (5), and development projects (3)
    • MI OER Summit – September 22, 2017 hosted by Kellogg Community College. Call for proposals due June 23.
    • MR Technologist Program: Kellogg CC, GVSU, Lansing CC, GRCC, Mid-Michigan, Lake Michigan – program received JRCERT accreditation.
    • New certificate programs coming: Computed Tomography Tech, Electroencephalogram Tech
    • Help Desk Initiative – Kirtland, KVCC, LMC, NCMC, Mott, provides 24/7 model that augments your campus help desk. Provides for CRAC Guidelines and SARA.
    • Collaborative Purchases: NetTutor, TechSmith, ZOOM, ReadSpeaker

Table Talks

  • Focused sessions on student orientation, virtual reality, course quality, encouraging support for online learning across campus, etc.